Tag Archives: Beethoven

Lucerne Festival Shake-Up: Mahler Out, Mozart and Beethoven In

I’m hugely disappointed:

Change of program:
LUCERNE FESTIVAL hereby announces that on 8 August as well as on 10 and 11 August, Claudio Abbado will conduct Beethoven’s Incidental music to “Egmont” and Mozart’s Requiem. For artistic reasons, this program replaces the originally scheduled Eighth Symphony by Gustav Mahler.

I had been planning to attend what was to be the culmination of Abbado’s Lucerne Mahler symphony cycle. Interesting that as of the hour of this post lucernefestival.ch seems to be having technical problems (style sheets and javascript are offline). I will post more information as soon as I know more.

Is He the Greatest Recording Era Conductor You’ve (Probably) Never Heard Of?

It was Ray Edwards – at the time buyer for Tower Records’ legendary, late, lamented classical department on West 4th and Broadway – that recommended I check out the recordings of British-born, Russian-raised conductor Albert Coates (I believe we’d been talking about the ever-popular “Toscanini vs. Furtwängler” debate and my having come down decidedly on the side of Willem Mengelberg).

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ATOS Trio @ The New School

Synaphaï welcomes Elizabeth Barnette as a contributing writer and critic.

Rachmaninoff: “Trio élégiaque” No. 1 in g minor
Dvorák: Piano Trio in g minor, Op. 26
Beethoven
: Piano Trio in B-flat Major “Archduke”, Op. 97

ATOS Trio
Annette von Hehn, violin / Stefan Heinemeyer, cello / Thomas Hoppe, piano

Tishman Auditorium, The New School, New York City
Sunday, April 10, 2011

After starting their American tour in Washington D.C. at the Kennedy Center on April 7, the ATOS Trio came to New York to play two different programs on Saturday evening and Sunday afternoon.

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Hammer of the Gods: Vänskä / Minnesota Orchestra @ Carnegie Hall

Okay, so it wasn’t a hammer, but a sword — and it was only on loan from one of the gods. I’m referring to the weapon which plays a singing role in the final movement of Sibelius’s “Kullervo.” My review of last night’s concert has just gone live at Classical Source.